Water Filters, Apocalypse Huel, Zombies - this thread has it all


#62

Are you still alive Christina? That’s the only excuse I am going to accept for not having received an update to your journal


#63

I did say i didn’t want to do a journal! let alone a daily one!
Anyway, the apocalypse is over.
The only excitement to report is that despite massive red and yellow ICE signs at either end of the road, numerous cars have skidded into ‘the dip’ as we call it around here.
We now have a puddle of cars, left abandoned at various angles.
Boringly, none are on top of any others… which is the usual theme each winter.
I have a nice view of the vehicular sculpture from my bathroom window.

Nothing else to report.
Oh except, I was kinda craving another coca-cola huel all day today…


#64

I give in!!!


#65

Photos! Phoootoooooos!!!


#66

Darn - I missed that photographic opportunity as all the cars have been cleared away this morning. I do have photos of a much more impressive vehicular scultpture from last year however if I can find them on my hard-drive (I’m really disorganised with my photos… sigh).
This weekend is due to be ‘the big freeze’ however, so there will no doubt be plenty more photo opportunities!!! Its a regular occurence in that particular spot. People never seem to learn…


#67

Keep it clean now @ChristinaT lol sorry couldn’t resist :smiley:


#68

Filtration is easy.
Take a 2l pop bottle. remove the lid and cut the bottom off. Crush charcoal to a powder, insert alternating layers of moss and charcoal. Pouring water through this is a very effective filtration system. It may discolour the water, but its perfectly safe to drink.


#69

Where I live, sourcing a plastic bottle would be easy enough although I’d be a bit concerned about who had drunk the cider and possibly left hepatitis behind.
Sourcing moss and / or charcoal would be a whole lot more challenging.
I’d have to walk a very long way to find either.
I’m pretty sure I’d get eaten by the zombies before I found enough to fill the bottle.

In all seriousness, does this actually work? Like if you’re camping and need to drink river water? I’d be tempted to trust it if I also boiled the water afterwards…


#70

Haha, well you know you can always light a fire and crush whats left for powdered charcoal! As with most filters, if you are talking river water, it wouldn’t necessarily be 100% potable after this, boiling is always recommended. But for improving the flavour of tapwater, it works.

The longer the filtration process, the better. Well-water is usually considered drinkable because water filtering through many layers of soil, gravel and plant-matter does tend to be relatively free of unpleasant pathogens.

I’ve used home-made carbon filters when wild-camping with no ill effects, but I don’t live down South, with higher population densities and greater water pollution… I wouldn’t take my anecdotal evidence as gospel!

However it is well known that carbon in t he form of charcoal is a very effective filter, especially if the surface area is maximised through crushing. Moss, especially spagnum, can also aid filtration. You can add other layers, such as washed gravel, as well.

I regularly use crushed charcoal to filter tap water and find it quite effective for improving the taste. I refuse to buy filters and a jug as they are expensive and usually made with plastic, and the waste (as well as rip off prices) put me off.


#71

Thats why I use a Berkefeld…
The one-off investment stainless steel cylinder will last a life-time, and the charcoal filters only need replacing once a year. Plus it’ll safely decontaminate river water when camping.
When the apocalypse comes and I can’t buy replacement ceramic charcoal filters on the net anymore, I’ll definitely attempt to make my own!