What’s wrong with soya?

Hello

What’s wrong with soy protein and soy flour?
Why don’t you use it in your products were some of your competitors use it extensively?

Thanks

Great question. Nutritionally, soy is a good product, it’s a complete source of protein. We balance pea protein with rice protein to give the same perfect PDCAAS score as Soy does (Protein Digestibility-Corrected Amino Acid Score). This method of measuring protein isn’t without it’s flaws, but is the accepted method used by the WHO.

The main reason is that soy is a ‘common’ allergen and adding it in would mean that many people wouldn’t be able to eat Huel.

You can read more about the protein in Huel here. Let us know if you have any other questions!

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Thanks for your answer!
So, except in the case of an allergy, there is no health issue with soya?

There has been a lot of misinformation and scare mongering about soya, I guess mainly concerning isoflavones and estrogen. I am happy to consume it.

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Actually there is one for the growing numbers of those who take thyroid hormones, as it can decrease the absorption of thyroxine in the intestines. Which is not a problem when you eat the same amount of soy all the time (then you just adapt the dose of thyroxine to it), but when you change from periods of no/little soy to much soy or vice versa - this can screw your thyroid hormone levels up.

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Systematic Review and Meta-analysis on the Effect of Soy on Thyroid Function:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-40647-x

If a product has Soya, I wont consume it. I am glad that Huel doesnt use it

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For me a lot of it is more to do with how soybeans are grown and the damage it’s doing to the environment. WWF sum it up nicely over here.

Plus whatever thickening agent they use in Alpro reacts with Huel and turns it into slime, not enjoyable.

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Bear in mind only about 6% of soybeans are fed directly to humans. The majority is fed to animals to then feed to humans. If we removed that link from the chain it wouldn’t be an issue.

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Well, if we stopped feeding it to animals so that we could then eat them… Would we not end up eating the soy ourselves?

When/if meat is taken out of our diet something has to replace it, no?

Huel doesn’t contain soy so we eat that.

But if we ate soy directly rather than feeding it to animals which we then eat then of course the demand for soy would be much lower. Feeding/fattening animals to eat on an industrial scale is a terrible waste of resources, when we could just eat the plants.

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It’s all relative. I may sound a bit crass here but the effort needed to get a steak and some lard cooked chips on my plate is worth it in my mind (right now at least). And don’t you come for my very occasional full english :wink:

I’m down with a lot of the problems with meat though, I hear them and I don’t always have it with every meal. But even putting soybeans aside our eating habits are just so incredibly wasteful and environmentally problematic. There are also deforestation issues around avocado’s and the sudden boom in quinoa saw local people being priced out of eating a staple food they’ve had for centuries.

Globalism, the industrialisation of all that we do, that to me is the big issue of the 21st century - not whether we’re eating meat or not. I’d like to see us all moving to more locally grown produce. That doesn’t need to mean within 30 miles, but tropical fruits and other things being flown or container shipped around the world need to go.

A lot of things don’t seem to make sense with regards to food production. From where I am typing right now I can see a couple of dozen sheep grazing in the corner of a field because the rest of the field today is unaccessible due to Ciara’s blowjob flooding it; nice British lamb if you like eating bay animals. Yet we (as a nation, not me personally) eat lamb that is imported from New Zealand which seems crazy. But bizarrely the carbon footprint of lamb produced in NZ and imported by UK is actually far lower than that grown here. There is a lot to talk into account and just because something is shipped long distances, it doesn’t mean it is worse for the environment.

And as an aside, I had to help push a car out of the very same river this morning as someone (travelling back to London) thought it was a good idea to drive across a flooded bridge (that was actually under water). Watching them do it I thought…nah mate, that’s not happening…they had to climb out the windows to get out.

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When I see sheep I think of this

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Yeah, he touched upon this again in the recent Channel 4 documentary Apocalypse Cow

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