Plant-based diets - biggest positive impact on the environment


#21

I wonder, some sort of life-cycle analysis including cost to consumer.

Love this idea. Have you read Homo Deus? Pop-science book by the same guy that did Sapiens (it’s the sequel). He talks about this concept briefly in it.


#22

His new book is now out. Great writer.


#23

Don’t get me started!


#24

Why not? I think the data is quite clear, but I’m always interested to hear all the various arguments around a topic.


#25

Me too. I was thinking about this https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/aug/25/veganism-intensively-farmed-meat-dairy-soya-maize


#26

Rather than being seduced by exhortations to eat more products made from industrially grown soya, maize and grains, we should be encouraging sustainable forms of meat and dairy production

No doubt that soya and maize farming are responsible for a lot of emissions, however…

Protein-rich soy is now produced in such huge quantities that the average European consumes approximately 61kg each year, largely indirectly by eating animal products such as chicken, pork, salmon, cheese, milk and eggs.

That’s from another Guardian article. I found a few sites that had various stats about how much of the world’s soya is actually produced for human consumption and how much is produced for animal consumption but wasn’t sure on their validity. I think the bottom line is that the vast majority of the world’s soya is produced for animal feed not humans. Therefore a plant-based diet is still better than a diet with lots of animal products in.

Anyone find anything better than my fumbled googlings?

Edit: Found a WWF article, at the bottom is says:

Approximately 80% of the soy produced in the world goes to feed cattle, pigs, chickens and farmed fish.


#27

Thanks Tim. All plant-based food for thought.