Will there be a Huel porridge?

I’m sure this has already been asked, but are there plans in the product extension pipeline to introduce a Huel porridge?

I don’t know but I’d love for the granola to make a return.

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Someone made one the other day on the fb hueligan group with 2 scoops of huel and 300ml soya milk,microwave for 90 seconds and served with a chopped banana

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I have made porridge before by using half porridge and half huel. It turned out fine. I used coconut milk first in the blender then added the porridge and huel. I microwaved for about 3 minutes. When cooked I then sprinkled some fruit and a small scoosh of coconut nectar and enjoyed. Yummy :bowl_with_spoon::coconut::banana:

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We’re always up to something, it’s a great idea! I guess when making porridge with Huel powder it can be a bit stodgy as you don’t get the texture from the whole, rolled oats. I can certainly see how we could do this. We’ve got a lot of stuff in the pipeline, but it’s good to know this popular.

RIP Granola. Our Head of Engineering still has some and occasionally sends me photos to rub it in. :sob:

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I’m consuming almost 100% Huel at the moment but on the rare occasions I fancy eating something, I make a bowl of Brose.

Brose is made with pinhead oatmeal, scalding hot water and a little salt to taste. Quite simply, scoop six large spoonfuls of oatmeal into a bowl, sprinkle some sea salt and add boiling water, stir well, adding more water until it is the right consistency, let it cool for a few minutes, and it’s ready to eat. You can dress it up with fruit, cream, honey, greek yoghurt or even some ice cream. You can be very adventurous with what you can dress it up with. Brose with double cream is sublime.

Brose is a very old Scottish recipe and was a staple food for hard working farm workers for generations. They would get unlimited sacks of oatmeal as part of their wages. It was simple and very quick to make a meal and it kept you filled for hours. Just what you need as farm work was very hard physical work.

In days long past, farm workers would get work at the ancient feeing markets. These were held at Michael Mass and Whitsun. These were very popular events in the Scottish and agricultural calendar. where farmers and farm workers could meet, shake on a six month term and you would get a shilling to seal the deal, which was invariably spent on some ale. The Brose package was important because it was needed to live on as you didn’t get paid until the end of the six month term. You would also get accomodation, either a bothy for the single workers or a cottage for the married workers. It’s hard to believe you would have to wait six months to get paid but this was the reality for decades. But it was sweetened with the perks of the job. Besides oatmeal, you would usually have a garden to grow vegetables, a pig at the end of the garden and a flock of hens so you could vary your diet quite cheaply.

I remember getting two pints of milk a day, fresh from the estate dairy as part of my wages too, which was great. These were the days where milk consumption was very common, as well as being very nutritious. We had none of these skimmed and semi skimmed options, it was full cream pints of milk we got and we would use the cream to add to the Brose.

It has to be said that overconsumption of oatmeal could result in skin problems. It’s not meant to be consumed three times a day, seven days a week for six months. It’s also got to be said that basic undressed Brose is boring and not really appealing, at first glance. But it is a super-food and it is easily enhanced with some imagination.

All these ancient traditions were slowly coming to an end but I was lucky to experience some of this when I left home at sixteen and went to work on a large farm and estate. It’s a long time ago but the experience was certainly character forming.

I digress, but my point is, oatmeal porridge or brose is a very simple, healthy and nutritious meal, with a very long history, particularly in Scotland. It compliments a Huel rich diet nicely.

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I have Huel as porridge every day!

100g Huel plus 300g hot water from a kettle, stir for a couple of minutes with a spoon. Quick and easy and I love it. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Hey @huelflower welcome!!

I tried this combo the other day and added the Chocolate Cherry Flavour Boost. It was so good! :smiley: I’d never tried BE Huel powder hot before but will be experimenting more often :innocent:

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Thanks for this Huelflower! I will definitely try myself as I’m a ‘thick Hueligan’ already, lol! Perhaps I am wrong here, but I recall reading somewhere that boiling water can kill some of the nutrients??

Yes, I think that when developing a true Huel porridge product, you should try to keep in mind runners like me who love eating hot porridge for long-lasting energy before an event or just going for a long run :+1:

I’ve had this before, too. Also reduced it a little and added porridge oats as well.

I think it would be more about texture and temperature rather than improving on the energy distribution. Huel has a much lower GI than porridge (55-79 vs Huel’s 16) , we might find if we ever made porridge that the GI was increased. I personally haven’t found porridge to keep me more full than Huel before long races, for me porridge is quite heavy and easily gives me a stitch (probably just me though!). But I can see the benefit of something warm and more nutritious than porridge on a cold morning.

I mix 40grms of porridge with 1 scoop of hule original dry. Then add water and give it a good stir. I leave this overnight. A quick top up of the water absorbed by the oats and it makes for a fairly creamy porridge when its heated up.

You could add milk instead of water in morning to level it up. I go with just oats, huel and water as I get a warm, fulfilling breakfast for just 400 kals.